Dating vintage clothing ilgwu

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Bishop sleeves (shown above) were a popular style of the quintessential ’70s Edwardian style maxi dress.

1980s: Batwing, dolman and puff shoulder sleeves were all the rage in the ’80s. DATING TIP: Identify whether a garment has lining or not.

Today’s post is different than the rest because it teaches you five easy ways to identify a garment’s most probable era based on construction details like buttons, zippers, seams, sleeves and lining.

It’s amazing how history has evolved the most simplest of garment details — and how when you compare pieces of the past, you can begin to see how this “puzzle” of dating vintage clothing isn’t as complicated as you once thought!

1930s: The infamous zipper is rarely seen on garments.

I wrote about eight easy ways to identify your garment as vintage, which helped you to recognize whether that great maxi dress you thrifted was actually from the ’70s or was just a 2012 lookalike.

Speaking of thrifting, I’ve also shared clues on how to identify vintage clothing labels in a thrift store and I’ve explained 11 ways to know a piece is vintage by its labels and tags and how the ILGWU union label can help you to date a garment’s era, too.

French seams are the neatest finish of seams, as the raw edges of the fabric are fully enclosed for clean lines.

1950s: Pinked seams — which look like scalloped teeth — are most common on garments from the ’50s because it was the easiest way to cut a seam without leaving fraying behind.

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